There’s Still Time to Gather Some Non-Perishables

I stopped off at a Costco the other day to replenish some paper products. Not much luck there. They were completely out of toilet paper.

Not surprising, I guess. Last week the Washington Post reported that pallets of toilet paper were selling out in less than two hours at Costco. Lines to get in were wrapped around buildings.

Shelves were being stripped bare of bagged rice and water bottles. Shortages of hand sanitizer were causing customers to become hostile.

Richard Galanti is the Costco CFO. Here’s how he summed up the situation. “It’s been nuts. We’re getting deliveries daily, but it’s still not enough given the increased levels of demands on certain key items.”

Ready to ride it out

Then I went over to the local Target to pick up a few items. Some shelves normally full to overflowing were about half empty.

Nothing to panic about. They still had what I needed. But it’s an indication that people are stocking up.

That’s what a global emergency will do. The real problem will come if people start hoarding AND the supply chain gets disrupted.

Most folks understand that quarantines are a potential reality. And if that occurs, they want to be ready to ride it out.

Don’t panic, just be prepared

A spokesperson for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently said that Americans in good health don’t need to stockpile supplies.

Some states health departments have communicated a very different message to the public.

It’s an unusual circumstance. One we haven’t seen for a while in this country. People don’t want to panic. On the other hand, they don’t want to be caught short if things get worse.

Adding to your emergency supply is never a bad idea. Regardless of what’s going on in the world. Let’s take a look at things some stores are having a tough time keeping in stock.

Products in demand

Among the items selling like hotcakes these days are paper towels, toilet paper, canned goods and even fruit.

Also, items such as peanut butter, coffee and powdered milk. As well as soap, disinfectant wipes and bleach.

The good news is that there is still time to stock up on most of the things you need for survival. 

My main concern is how quickly things are changing. Something that’s available in a store today might not be available a week from now.

Supplies to consider

Here’s a list of non-food items you might want to make sure you have on hand in the near future.

  • Paper products, including towels, toilet paper, cups, plates and bowls.
  • Flashlights
  • Batteries
  • Water purifier
  • First-aid kit
  • Emergency radio
  • Manual can opener
  • Blankets
  • Hygiene items
  • Tools
  • Cash
  • Important documents including emergency contacts
  • Medications

Food items to secure

Here’s a list of non-perishable food items that would be good to have on hand.

  • Survival food
  • Bottled water
  • Granola or cereal
  • Peanut butter
  • Instant coffee
  • Boxed non-dairy milk
  • Juice boxes
  • Trail mix
  • Dried fruit
  • Protein bars
  • Canned meats and vegetables
  • Canned soups and stews
  • Pasta
  • Rice
  • Whole grains including wheat and oats
  • Jerky
  • Vegetable oils
  • Mac and cheese
  • Single-serving fruit cups and applesauce
  • Nuts
  • Crackers
  • Vitamins and supplements
  • Comfort food
  • Pet food and pet supplies 

Choose – and store – wisely

These types of lists are never complete. You can always come up with other items that would be good to add.

Of course, when it comes to survival food, you’re better off with freeze-dried items in packaging that will preserve the nutritional value and taste for many years.

Regardless of what types of food you stockpile, where you keep it is important. You want to choose a dry, cool and dark area of your home.

And make sure to use those foods before they expire, rotating your supply. Place your newer items behind the older ones.

As I mentioned earlier, there is no need for panic. But stockpiling food with a long shelf life, as well as water and other supplies, is always a good idea. 

If you don’t use them during the current crisis, something else is sure to come along before too long.

Previous article The Many Benefits of Freeze-Dried Food in a Crisis
Next article How to Use What You Already Have in New Ways

Leave a comment

Comments must be approved before appearing

* Required fields